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WP Troubleshooting plugin

How to Troubleshoot WordPress plugin issue?

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November 19, 2019 0 Comment

WP Troubleshooting plugin

WordPress plugin error troubleshooting or maybe where to look for help when the website opens up with an error or not at all working, all these are not something WordPress clients need to manage, yet they’re unavoidable when you utilize the platform all the time.

Some WordPress plugins are coded ineffectively, which can cause issues when you install and activate them. There are more plugins which might not be coded ineffectively until the designer releases an update, which is the reason the user may experience issues subsequently after applying an update.
Whatever the case might be, you introduced another plugin or refreshed a present one, and now your site isn’t working appropriately. We are discussing all the possibilities of WordPress Plugin troubleshooting in bits and pieces.

You recognize which plugin is the problematic

If you know which WordPress plugin is causing the issue, your troubleshooting job got a lot easier. All you likely need to do is deactivate the plugin.
How can you determine which plugin is causing the issue without troubleshooting? There are a few different ways you can tell.

  • You installed a single plugin and experienced issues with your site either immediately or soon after.
  • You updated a single plugin and experienced issues with your site immediately after.
  • There’s an error message telling you exactly which file is causing the issue, and it’s a plugin file.

This error message may be written across somewhere on the site or the backend of WordPress.

  • You can also use a plugin called Query Monitor to discover PHP warnings from plugins.
  • Install and activate the plugin on your site if you don’t know which plugin is causing an issue.
  • A “Warnings” selection appears in the drop-down menu for this plugin whenever there’s a PHP error.

This will tell you exactly where the errors are coming from and will tell you exactly which plugin is causing the error.

In case that you know which Plugin is initiating the issue, your investigation will get significantly simpler. You likely should simply deactivate the plugin.

How can you figure out which plugin is causing the issue without investigating? There are a couple of ways you can tell.

  • You installed and activated the single plugin and experienced issues with your website either promptly or a little later.
  • You updated the plugin and experienced issues with your site.
  • There is an error message letting you know precisely which file is causing the issue, and belongs to a plugin document.
  • This error message might be composed crosswise over someplace on the site or the backend of WordPress.
  • You can likewise utilize a module called Query Monitor to find PHP errors from plugins.
  • Install and activate the plugin on your website if you don’t know which plugin is causing an issue.
  • A “Warnings” determination shows up in the drop-down menu for this plugin at whatever point there’s a PHP error.

You do not know which plugin is creating issue

This will let you know precisely where the errors are coming from and will let you know precisely which plugin is causing the problem.

This is where things start getting a little more complicated, but it’s still not as scary as you think. If you don’t know which plugin is the culprit but you know that a plugin is to blame, all you need to do is deactivate all of your plugins and activate them one by one until you find the one that’s causing the issue.

Again, if you don’t know which plugin is causing an issue, use the Query Monitor plugin mentioned earlier to see if any of your plugins are emitting PHP errors.

You are able to access your website

Your job is even easier if you can access your site. Follow these steps:

  • Go to the Plugins page.
  • Tick the checkbox at the top of the plugin list to select all plugins.
  • Click Bulk Actions, and select Deactivate.
  • Click Apply.

This should deactivate all of the plugins on your site. Check to see if it’s indeed fixed. If it is, a plugin is at fault. Follow the rest of the steps if that’s the case. If there’s still an issue, the culprit is elsewhere, likely a corrupted theme or WordPress core file.
Activate the first plugin on the list.
Check your site to see if it breaks. If it does, the plugin you activated is the culprit. Continue if all is well.
Repeat steps 6 and 7 until you find the plugin causing the issue.

What are the options?

Okay, so you found a faulty plugin. What’s next? Well, there are several different ways you can resolve this issue:

  • Connect with a developer
  • Get help from the WordPress community
  • Replace problematic plugin

When your website breakdown, it can be stressful, especially if you can’t access your website to try and rectify the issue.
But with these steps, you’ll be able to narrow down the issue to the exact plugin that’s causing the problem. Then you’ll know exactly who to contact in order to get the problem resolved.

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